NFL.com

COVERAGE of the SUPER BOWL 

This page provides a summary of research results for NFL.com’s photographic coverage of the 2013 Super Bowl .

NFL.com‘s PHOTOS of the SUPER BOWL*

NFL-Logo1During the Super Bowl, NFL.com compiled most of its photo coverage  into  slide shows that it organized by different aspects of the game, such as on-the-field action, behind the scenes scenes, the halftime performance, etc.. In addition, NFL.com also used social media to display Super Bowl footage, taking advantage primarily of their Instagram account, but using Twitter as well — NFL.com tweeted 7 photos via Twitter and posted 68 photos on Instagram.

Overall, researchers pinned* 463 photos and videos from NFL.com the night of and day after the Super Bowl, with game play, halftime and post-game celebration shots dominating the coverage, often collected in related slideshows. Lengthy and descriptive captions were not used within these slideshows, however, which may have made it harder for the audience to know what was taking place within the picture or who the main players were within the photo.

  • Of the 102 halftime photos, NFL.com pictured Beyoncé in almost all of them. Beyoncé appeared in 96% of the halftime photos — in sheer numbers, surpassing NFL.com‘s attention to MVP Joe Flacco and other star players from both the Ravens and 49ers.
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NFL.com featured the Baltimore Ravens in more photos than the San Francisco 49ers — an imbalance in large measure because of the numerous Raven’s post-game photos. — NFL.com

  • Despite NFL.com being an overall National Football League outlet, two times as many photos exclusively represented the Baltimore Ravens compared to the San Francisco 49ers, although NFL.com published almost equal number of photos of the two quarterbacks, Joe Flacco and Colin Kaepernick.
  • NFL.com published more photos of the game itself than any other news outlet within the study.
Anquan Boldin's touchdown was one of the "Top 10 Photos of Super Bowl XLVII," a slideshow featured on NFL.com

NFL.com’s photographic coverage emphasized key plays on the field, including the Ravens’ first quarter touchdown. — NFL.com

(Click here to see NFL.com‘s photos that researchers pinned to Pinterest. There is also another board here, and one specifically devoted to Instagram.)

These images from NFL.com are a sampling of its photo coverage of the Super Bowl. Clicking a photo links to the Pinterest board of that photo.

Focus of  NFL.com‘s Photo Coverage during the Super Bowl

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The majority of NFL.com’s photos focused on the actual game play and the winning team’s post-game.

  • Roughly one-fifth of the NFL’s photographic coverage of the game featured the action on the field — but despite being a “football” outlet, NFL.com devoted an almost equal amount of coverage to Beyoncé’s halftime show.
  • NFL.com is the National Football League’s news outlet — NFL.com does not cover an exclusive “home team.”   Yet the NFL published substantially more coverage of the winning Baltimore Ravens than the San Francisco 49ers.

PINTEREST

Researchers found NFL.com to be a fairly “pin-able” website, allowing photos from the main homepage and slideshows to be pinned. There were a few videos posted to NFL.com, however, that researchers could not pin, which may not have given viewers of NFL.com the full Super Bowl experience via Pinterest. Therefore, those pictures viewed on the Pinterest site were only a majority of the pictures originally viewed on NFL.com, but not the full set.

CONTEXT: The NFL was created on Sept. 17, 1920 in Canton, Ohio, and was first named the American Professional Football Association (APFA), and included 10 teams. It was later renamed the National Football League (NFL) in 1922, and held its first championship game in 1933. In 1960, the American Football League was created, resulting in the two leagues combining and adding the Super Bowl game. NFL.com provides online access to all 32 NFL team websites, statistics, scores, player information, news around the league, fantasy sports, videos and e-commerce.


* NB: Researchers applied the same collection methodology for all the news outlets studied. It is likely that the researchers on this survey did not collect every photograph published, and, on occasion, certain photographs that could be viewed were not collectible by Pinterest. The total number of photographs studied, therefore, should be understood to be representative of those published on the news outlets, not an absolute set of all photographs published on all sites.
It is fair to note, however, that the number of photographs of either game collected for any given site is a rough indication of the commitment of that site to photographically covering that specific game.